Closer to Wildlife
Conservation

Conservation

At the park, we are involved in many breeding programmes for endangered species.

These can be either European Studbooks (ESB) or European Endangered Species Programmes (EEP). These studbooks contain information about every individual in the population to ensure that captive animals remain healthy and that research, husbandry improvements and conservation are a priority. Each studbook is managed by an animal professional who compiles all relevant data for a species and provides recommendations for pairings, promotes conservation projects and distributes information on the species as widely as possible. The Cotswold Wildlife Park holds the EEP for Lar Gibbons and the ESB for Red Crested Touracos.

The Park is actively involved in conservation in the wild. As well as raising funds for these projects, we also raise awareness with talks and presentations.

Sifaka Conservation

Sifaka Conservation

This project aims to protect Crowned Sifaka in forest fragments in Central and Western Madagascar. Very small family groups of this species have been found in tiny patches of the remaining forest and we are working towards the management of these groups as part of a “metapopulation”. As well as funding, we have provided this project with camping equipment, radios, capture equipment and technical assistance. Techniques learned from this project may well prove extremely useful, not only for the population of Crowned Sifaka, but for many other species throughout the world that are currently at risk from habitat destruction.

Project Bamboo Lemur and Helpsimus

Project Bamboo Lemur and Helpsimus

A project dedicated to the discovery and protection of new groups of this little known lemur, one of the worlds most endangered Primates. We have been heavily involved with the project since its inception and have watched it go from strength to strength in recent years. Many of the observations we have made from our small group at the Park have been made available to researchers working in the field and in some cases, have not been seen before. Please click the link to the bizarre courtship display of our male Ivongo.

Hornbill nest monitoring project

Hornbill nest monitoring project

We are proud to support this scheme, where members of the local communities monitor the nest sites of hornbill pairs and supply us with information on wild diets, chicks reared and preferred nest sites.

TUSK trust

TUSK Trust

We use money from our Keeper for a Day scheme to fund, amongst others, the Serengeti Rabies Vaccination project which focusses on the vaccination of domestic dogs in villages surrounding the Serengeti. This is vital to prevent the spread of this disease to wild carnivores, and to limit infection in the human population

Wild Camel Protection Foundation

Wild Camel Protection Foundation

Despite their familiarity, wild camels are declining fast, the Wild Camel Protection Foundation, led by John Hare, aims to save the “wild” Bactrian camel in its natural habitat.

Other projects we are involved in at the Park include:

  • Falklands conservation
  • The World Parrot Trust
  • Lac Alaotra Biodiversity Project
  • Phillipines Biodiversity Project
  • Songbird Survival
  • Project Utila Iguana
  • Seychelles
  • World Pheasant Association
  • Nestbox Monitoring Scheme (local native species)
  • Friends of Wychwood Forest